Sixty Joyless De-Britished Uncrowned Commonpoor Years (1949-2009)

Elizabeth II Vice-Regal Saint: Remembering Paul Comtois (1895–1966), Lt.-Governor of Québec
Britannic Inheritance: Britain's proud legacy. What legacy will America leave?
English Debate: Daniel Hannan revels in making mince meat of Gordon Brown
Crazy Canucks: British MP banned from Canada on national security grounds
Happy St. Patrick's: Will Ireland ever return to the Commonwealth?
Voyage Through the Commonwealth: World cruise around the faded bits of pink.
No Queen for the Green: The Green Party of Canada votes to dispense with monarchy.
"Sir Edward Kennedy": The Queen has awarded the senator an honorary Knighthood.
President Obama: Hates Britain, but is keen to meet the Queen?
The Princess Royal: Princess Anne "outstanding" in Australia.
H.M.S. Victory: In 1744, 1000 sailors went down with a cargo of gold.
Queen's Commonwealth: Britain is letting the Commonwealth die.
Justice Kirby: His support for monarchy almost lost him appointment to High Court
Royal Military Academy: Sandhurst abolishes the Apostles' Creed.
Air Marshal Alec Maisner, R.I.P. Half Polish, half German and 100% British.
Cherie Blair: Not a vain, self regarding, shallow thinking viper after all.
Harry Potter: Celebrated rich kid thinks the Royals should not be celebrated
The Royal Jelly: A new king has been coronated, and his subjects are in a merry mood
Victoria Cross: Australian TROOPER MARK DONALDSON awarded the VC
Godless Buses: Royal Navy veteran, Ron Heather, refuses to drive his bus
Labour's Class War: To expunge those with the slightest pretensions to gentility
100 Top English Novels of All Time: The Essential Fictional Library
BIG BEN: Celebrating 150 Years of the Clock Tower

Tuesday, 16 January 2007

Not One Petition in Favour of Union with England

"A Scots rabble is the worst of its kind, for every Scot in favour there is 99 against"

- Daniel Defoe, English writer and spy leading up to the Acts of Union (Sir John Clerk on Defoe: "He was a spy among us, but not known as such, otherwise the Mob of Edinburgh would pull him to pieces.")

Even though prevailing public opinion in Scotland was overwhelmingly against it, three hundred years ago today on January 16, 1707, the Scottish Parliament ratified the Treaty of Union with England and dissolved itself by a majority vote of 110 to 69 (England ratified the previous year, and the Kingdom of Great Britain came into effect on May 1, 1707). Many petitions were sent against Union, and there were massive protests in Edinburgh and several other Scottish towns on the day it was passed. Threats of widespread civil unrest resulted in the imposition of martial law.

The 1707 Treaty of Union creating the Kingdom of Great Britain
Sir John Clerk, an ardent pro-unionist and Union negotiator, observed that the treaty was "contrary to the inclinations of at least three-fourths of the Kingdom". Sir George Lockhart, a Jacobite and the only member of the Scottish negotiating team who was not pro-incorporation, noted that "The whole nation appears against the Union". Public opinion against the Treaty as it passed through the Scottish Parliament was voiced through petitions from Scottish localities. Anti-union petitions were received from shires, burghs, presbyteries and parishes. Not one petition in favour of an incorporating union was received by Parliament. - Wikipedia

Walter Thomas Monnington's 1925 painting called Parliamentary Union of England and Scotland 1707 hangs in the Palace of Westminster, depicting the official presentation of the law that formed the Kingdom of Great Britain.

3 comments:

Scott said...

It was either Union or invasion! The Scots should be grateful. (Seriously, amalgamation of some sort had to occur for geopolitical progress; can you imagine if both England and Scotland had remained even more engrossed than they did in bitter rivalry, if not enmity? To look outward we had largely to stop looking so constantly inward. Our horizons shifted entirely. No British Empire, no English or Scottish Empire either, without the Act of Union; no modern day USA, Canada, Australia, NZ, really.)

If we part ways, and Britain is over, then Oz and NZ flags will change (along with Ontario, etc, etc, etc). If the flags change, the demolition of Monarchy is advanced one step further, for one more link in the golden chains that bind us, will have been severed.

New ton said...

Actually he Instrument of Government was released in 1653, under The Big C

J.J. said...

The flags will not change. The flags of NZ, Australia, Ontario, etc are the independent creations of those territories, not mere placeholders. Whatever their respective legislatures enshrined as their national flag will remain their national flag regardless of what happens in the UK.