Sixty Joyless De-Britished Uncrowned Commonpoor Years (1949-2009)

Elizabeth II Vice-Regal Saint: Remembering Paul Comtois (1895–1966), Lt.-Governor of Québec
Britannic Inheritance: Britain's proud legacy. What legacy will America leave?
English Debate: Daniel Hannan revels in making mince meat of Gordon Brown
Crazy Canucks: British MP banned from Canada on national security grounds
Happy St. Patrick's: Will Ireland ever return to the Commonwealth?
Voyage Through the Commonwealth: World cruise around the faded bits of pink.
No Queen for the Green: The Green Party of Canada votes to dispense with monarchy.
"Sir Edward Kennedy": The Queen has awarded the senator an honorary Knighthood.
President Obama: Hates Britain, but is keen to meet the Queen?
The Princess Royal: Princess Anne "outstanding" in Australia.
H.M.S. Victory: In 1744, 1000 sailors went down with a cargo of gold.
Queen's Commonwealth: Britain is letting the Commonwealth die.
Justice Kirby: His support for monarchy almost lost him appointment to High Court
Royal Military Academy: Sandhurst abolishes the Apostles' Creed.
Air Marshal Alec Maisner, R.I.P. Half Polish, half German and 100% British.
Cherie Blair: Not a vain, self regarding, shallow thinking viper after all.
Harry Potter: Celebrated rich kid thinks the Royals should not be celebrated
The Royal Jelly: A new king has been coronated, and his subjects are in a merry mood
Victoria Cross: Australian TROOPER MARK DONALDSON awarded the VC
Godless Buses: Royal Navy veteran, Ron Heather, refuses to drive his bus
Labour's Class War: To expunge those with the slightest pretensions to gentility
100 Top English Novels of All Time: The Essential Fictional Library
BIG BEN: Celebrating 150 Years of the Clock Tower

Thursday, 8 February 2007

Make This Man Britain's Prime Minister

I know it deep down that if Churchill were alive today, he would be campaigning for the United Kingdom Independence Party and its leader, Nigel Farage. Go over to Andrew Cusack's creation to witness firsthand his whistleblowing attacks and blistering leadership in the European Parliament against the corrupt Commission, proving once again that the useless EU is an institution entirely for the self-aggrandisement and financial benefit of politicians. Trust me, you could not make this stuff up. It is good. It is that good.


And this is the man that David Cameron would have us believe is a fruitcake and loonie and closet racist. Be careful with your politically slanderous accusations, Dave. We know what kind of elitist yob you were as a young adult at Oxford, how you and your secret Bullingdon buddies went on destructive binges and trashed restaurants just for kicks. Don't make us go there, Dave, though go there I will in a future post.

Understandably, Mr. Farage's categorisation of the Tories as not New Labour, but Blue Labour might have Dave a little perturbed: "We've got three social democratic parties in Britain -- Labour, Lib Dem and Conservative are virtually indistinguishable from each other on nearly all the main issues" and "you can't put a cigarette paper between them and that is why there are nine million people who don't vote now in general elections that did back in 1992." And that's why Andrew Cusack is right for suggesting we should be a Tory every day of the year except election day.

But back to EUtopia or EUrabia, or whatever people are calling it these days. Nigel Farage is the only one providing real leadership on the issue. In his own words, in terms of his position as a Member of the European Parliament, he is "the only turkey that would vote for Christmas":

My commitment to fighting against the Tower of Babel that is in Brussels demands that I make certain sacrifices to save my country, and to do what I can to carry on the fight of those people who sacrificed so much to keep this United Kingdom free from tyranny. I feel that it is important that the British people should be given the facts about the European Union, rather than the lies and half-truths that are spread by the political elite of this country and those of the member states. The sooner this country can agree an amicable withdrawal from the EU, the better...

Successive British governments have, without the permission of the British electorate, continued to ignore public opinion in driving forward to sign up to a European superstate. Working in the European parliament has given me an insight into the excesses of the bureaucratic nightmare that exists in Brussels. I feel that the time has come for a return to honest politics in this country, where an elected representative tells his voters the truth and not support his party to the detriment of the country. The fraud and waste that is endemic in the EU is an abomination...

My vision is a free people in a free country. For all of our history we resisted invasion and our people resisted tyranny. Our country is the home of modern democracy and a major exporter of liberty to the rest of the world. It is intolerable that after all our forebears have done for us, today’s political leaders should be replacing national independence with subservience to the EU, and individual liberty with an authoritarian collective state. I will fight both of these tooth and nail.

12 comments:

Scott said...

Voting for him will, of course, only make Gordon Brown Prime Minister... and let in dozens of Liberal Democrats across the country in marginal seats. It is a horrible dilemma - as much as I despair at the lack of genuine conservative parties, voting for this one is likely only to give us sheer hell for many more years to come.

I do think that the Tories will eventually come round to the UKIP way of thinking about Europe, actually. They already promise to withdraw from its Human Rights Convention and Social Charter. If they achieve power, the centre will shift, EU-wise, considerably right; making future advocation of withdrawal far less extreme than Labour/Libs can presently characterise it.

I'm not sure which is more risky, trusting the Tories and setting back UKIP, or teaching the Tories a lesson (setting them back) and trusting UKIP... The thing is, the Tories failed to win around 30 seats at the last election because of UKIP voters; and that seems not to have woken them up one bit.

The Monarchist said...

It is a terrible dilemma alright. Political leadership requires one to pursuade the electorate on principle, not try and follow it to merely win power. If David Cameron wins power and turns out to be a Nigel Farage in hiding, great. But if not, what has voting Tory got me, other than a variant of New Labour?

Scott said...

It's a gamble as to whether or not anything other than a variant of New Labour could get elected. After all, New Labour originally sold itself as a nicer, cuddlier varient of the Tories (same budgets for the first term, privatisation continued, no direct income tax hikes, etc). In power, they've been radically different, pulling the country Stalin-leftwards on many matters (tax, surveillance, DNA harvesting, police powers, public spending, etc).

You get elected on the centre ground, and shift the centre ground with power.

I think.

On the other hand you stake out a radical position, and hope to call all the disaffected to you... despite what they say, that wasn't really tried in 2001 or 2005. I'd like to see a shot at it. Policies: flat tax, border control, no ID cards, insurance based healthcare, mandatory British history to GCSE standard, kick out all radical imams, huge increase in MoD spending, preservation of historic regiments, vouchers system for schools, end of devolution, restoration of House of Lords (or transformation into fully-elected Senate... I think it's the best of all the available options: we need some upper house scrutiny with teeth)...

Scott said...

It's a gamble as to whether or not anything other than a variant of New Labour could get elected. After all, New Labour originally sold itself as a nicer, cuddlier varient of the Tories (same budgets for the first term, privatisation continued, no direct income tax hikes, etc). In power, they've been radically different, pulling the country Stalin-leftwards on many matters (tax, surveillance, DNA harvesting, police powers, public spending, etc).

You get elected on the centre ground, and shift the centre ground with power.

I think.

On the other hand you stake out a radical position, and hope to call all the disaffected to you... despite what they say, that wasn't really tried in 2001 or 2005. I'd like to see a shot at it. Policies: flat tax, border control, no ID cards, insurance based healthcare, mandatory British history to GCSE standard, kick out all radical imams, huge increase in MoD spending, preservation of historic regiments, vouchers system for schools, end of devolution, restoration of House of Lords (or transformation into fully-elected Senate... I think it's the best of all the available options: we need some upper house scrutiny with teeth)...

Unrepentant Jacobite said...

Better the UKIP than these Tories.

Here in the dying USA, the Democrats and Republicans are in a similar mess as the three parties in the UK...all controlled by globalist fanatics and tax-and-spend maniacs.

So better to vote for UKIP than not at all.

Splendor Sine Occasu said...

We had a similar problem in British Columbia in the 90's. When the free-enterprise coalition of the Social Credit Party split, with liberal free-enterprisers supporting the BC Liberal Party and conservatives supporting Reform BC, the socialist New Democratic Party won in 1991 and 1996. The free-enterprise vote was split substantially enough in both elections that even though the NDP had less votes, there were still able to garner a majority in the Legislature. It was not until after 10 years of destructive socialist policies that the BC Liberal Party became conservative enough to appeal to most conservative voters, to rebuild the free-enterprise coalition that once was Social Credit.

So while voting UKIP may bring in some very bad governments due to vote splitting, this usually encourages parties to re-examine their policies and to bring back their core supporters that they had lost to smaller parties.

The Monarchist said...

Very good point, Splendour. Give the people a Glen Clark and their apathy will coalesce and consolidate into voter anger soon enough.

Splendor Sine Occasu said...

Having said all that, now I will vote BC Liberal because of what I've seen the NDP do to this great province. Despite their leftward slide since the 2005 election, they are a far better choice than the Socialist Horde. I fear for another split in the free-enterprise coalition.

Dundonald said...

For me there is no dilemma. We, the voters, owe the Conservative Party nothing; we do not owe them a livelihood. If the Conservatives want my vote, they will have to earn it. As a (small c) conservative, I will vote for any party that espouses conservative values. At the moment, this party is UKIP. As the Lords Pearson and Willoughby de Broke stated when they crossed the floor to UKIP, “We did not leave the Conservative party, the Conservative party left us”.

If one wants self-government, low taxes, controlled immigration, selective education, control of our own trade, and a return to free-market libertarian values, UKIP is the only choice.

If the next Prime Minister is David Cameron or Gordon Brown, it will scarcely make any difference. We will still contribute £12 billion annually to a sclerotic kleptocracy that is responsible for 80% of our legislation. We will still have an open border to 400 million EU “citizens”. We will still be subject to the trade, environment, transport, employment, and security policies of the European Union.

David Cameron has promised EU “reform”, without identifying how this will be achieved. Successive British Governments have been promising reform for 30 years. David Cameron has promised to restore the British “opt-out” of the Social Chapter (the particularly inflexible employment laws introduced by the Treaty of Maastricht). However, he fails to realise that there is no such thing as the “opt-out” any more. The opt-out was negotiated by John Major and surrendered by Tony Blair. Its provisions are now enshrined by the Treaty of Amsterdam—changing these would require the unanimous support of all 27 member states of the EU. Cameron’s position on this matter exemplifies either ignorance or stupidity, which is it? Either way, he is unfit to be Prime Minister.

The EU scam on the British people is over. It’s time for the Conservatives to put into practice the values they purport to uphold. We need to withdraw from the EU. If it takes another Conservative election defeat for them to realise this, then so be it.

The Monarchist said...

Great comment, Dundonald. Now when are you going to post again?

Splendor Sine Occasu said...

Well, it appears as though the current Conservative Party needs a smack upside its' collective head! I wouldn't blame Tories if they abandoned the Conservatives for the UKIP...you realisticaly could not get worse than a Labour government.

Living in the New Labour gulag said...

In local elections across the UK, UKIP are making very little progress in seats they contest. They are continaully being outflanked by the British National Party (BNP) who are articulating many of the concerns that the mainstream parties seem afraid to raise and who are the bigger threat.

The only problem is that the BNP are the heirs of the neo-fascist parties of days gone by. They have in their ranks all the usual holocaust deniers and other rascist nutters. We are dealing with real rascists here, not ordinary people labelled as such by the PC brigrade.

UKIP has been accused of flirting with the BNP, hence their nickname "BNP in blazers," but I am unsure as to how accurate that accusation is.

The BNP are much better organizated, UKIP are an undisciplined rabble fighting among themselves. However, I do agree that Conservatives do need to kept on their toes over the European Union issue.